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Race Tech Suspension Bible Preview


If you work on your own bikes, the Race Tech Suspension Bible highlighted below will prove indispensable at first glance as this book truly demystify's the "Black Art" of suspension tuning, as the book covers everything suspension related from the very basics of how suspension components control and damp the oscillations of a wheel's movement, to how to calculate and measure spring rates or variables to consider should you want to build your own mid-valve or valve stack.

In addition to what's in the preview below, this book really starts proving it's worth once you get to the "Suspension Service" section but since we can't reveal the entirety of the book, this isn't visible, although we've highlighted what's offered in the ever valuable 2nd half of the book that isn't revealed elsewhere and that can be found below.

What's in the Book?

Once you get your hands on this book, you'll likely have a feeling of never needing to send your suspension off for another revalve, oil or seal replacement, as this book covers complete service from the speciality tools required for proper suspension service and disassembly, to cleaning, inspection and reassembly, or modification (including re-valving) of Showa, and KYB components.

Considering this books covers the aforementioned topics, along with additional info relative to Progressive Damping System's (PDS) White Power (WP) & Öhlins suspension components, that makes this paperback book something to definitely add to your tool collection as it's sure to come in handy during future suspension service and dirt bike maintenance operations.

Simply Put, It's a Toolbox Must Have!!

Front Suspension


Picture of Measuring Spring Preload on A Damping Rod Fork
  • Damping Rod Forks
    Damping Rod Forks were / are common on Vintage and some Evolution class dirt bikes, and they're a conventional design without external "Clickers" and can easily be identified by the shiny tube, and a Schrader valve on top.

    Although Damping rod forks do have the least amount of adjustability, the forks can be made to perform much better than stock, and what's really nice is that the book not only covers complete disassembly, cleaning, inspection and reassembly of this fork, it's even got tips on how YOU can improve this fork by installing tunable Cartridge Emulators.




Image Showing Disassembly of a Cartridge Fork
  • Cartridge Forks
    Cartridge Forks do come in inverted and conventional design but are easily defined by having the Rebound (TEN) adjuster at the top and the Compression adjuster at the bottom.

    Cartridge forks are commonly seen on competitive natured 50's, 65's, 80's and 85's, as well as plenty of Evolution class racers are doing well suspended on these, and the book does cover full disassembly, cleaning, inspection and reassembly (including bleeding) of this fork and it's internal components.




Picture of Special Wrench Required for Disassembly of a Twin Chamber Fork
  • Twin Chamber Forks
    Twin Chamber Forks have a "COMP" adjuster at the top and "REB" or "TEN" for rebound adjustment is at the bottom and Twin Chamber Forks are by far the most common style fork on most modern Motocross bikes so we're all in luck here.

    Not only does the book cover complete disassembly, cleaning, inspection and reassembly (including bleeding) of this fork, it also covers disassembly, cleaning, inspection and reassembly of the compression assembly (the top part of the fork)

Rear Suspension


Picture of an Emulsion Shock Being Disassembled
  • Emulsion Shocks,
    Emulsion shocks are common but this doesn't mean they're anything to write home about as they do not have any externally adjustable damping circuits, and are frequently limited on the spring preload adjustments.

    Luckily the book covers complete disassembly and reassembly of this shock absorber to enable oil replacement as there are plenty Emulsion shocks at the rear of many vintage motocross bikes and other off-road motorcycles that are likely in desperate need of an oil change.





Picture Showing Disassembly of a Showa Reservoir Shock
  • Reservoir Shocks,
    Reservoir Shocks generally have externally adjustable high and low speed compression damping as well as rebound damping and these are by far the most common shock absorber on most modern, as well as evolution class motocross bikes.

    What's great is that this section of the book not only covers complete disassembly, cleaning, inspection and reassembly (including bleeding) of a Reservoir shock, it even illustrates the ever important step of surfacing the piston before reassembly.



PDS Style Öhlins & White Power (WP)

Picture of a PDS Shock's Internal Valving Disassembled

Picture of a Normal Shock Shaft Beside a PDS Shock Shaft

PDS White Power (WP) & Öhins Shocks,
If you're running a PDS style setup you likely know it as these are often a selling point of a motorcycle as the Progressive Damping System's are common on linkless setups, and are generally considered a higher performance suspension than what comes stock on most off-road motorcycles with the exception of KTM's as they're built "Ready to Race" remember.

Make no mistake when comparing a PDS shock to a conventional Reservoir shock as there are definitely very distinct differences between these and conventional reservoir style shock absorbers which the book details in addition to it's excellent advice on doing a complete disassembly, cleaning, inspection and reassembly (including bleeding) of a White Power (WP) or Öhlins PDS Shock absorber.




Race Tech's Suspension Bible Preview




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